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Let's face it: the winter isn't the best season to take on a major home improvement project. However, for some, it's the perfect time to install and/or replace their vinyl siding. While approaching this project, there's a few factors that should be taken into consideration. Check out the pros and cons on vinyl siding installation in the winter below and let us know what you think!

Pros

Stress-free Installation

Assuming the weather is reasonable, it makes the most sense to book the installation in the winter because contractors are more like to be available. They're usually overscheduled during the warmer months, so there's a stronger chance that installation can be more efficient and inexpensive in November and December.

Cheaper Rates

For obvious reasons, contractors see a large dropoff in clients when winter comes around. Because of this, vinyl siding installation can be relatively cheap compared to other seasons. So if you're one of many people who postponed their siding project due because of high costs, the winter might be the perfect time to get this done at a reasonable price.

Summer Heat Affects Heat

Vinyl siding expands in the heat so if it's installed in hot weather and nailed in too tight, it could buckle. The fall and early-winter provide the ideal temperatures for vinyl siding installation and ensure the least amount of problems as each winter passes.

Cons

Cold Weather

Chilly weather makes installation frustrating because the colder it gets, the easier the vinyl will crack. Putting in the siding in temperatures lower than 40 degrees increases chances for cracking and buckling. Some homes avoid any damage, but too many issues can occur during installation so it's not recommended.

Longer Completion Time

If you live in a warm weather state, any season is ideal for installing siding. However, those in the Northeast endure far harsher climates especially in the winter, therefore lengthening the process. Typically, siding is placed on a home's exterior sections at a time to minimize cold air entering through as well as damaging the side of the house. Couple this with extreme weather, and the installation could eventually stretch into a two-month project.