Bay and Bow windows are multi-faced windows that project outwards.  Both increase the amount of natural light inside, add space, and provide a more open feel.  Choosing bay or bow windows for replacement windows also boosts curb appeal.

Construction

Bow windows are usually wider and bay windows are usually deeper.  Bay windows typically have three adjacent faces at 30 or 45' angles.  The center panel is usually a picture window, surrounded by a double hung or casement window on each side to let fresh air in.

Bow windows are constructed of between three to six equally sized adjacent panels at shallower angles, usually around 10'. Bow windows are wider than bay windows and let more natural light inside.  They can also wrap around a corner to provide a view from of multiple sides of your house. 

Privacy Considerations

We recommend bay and bow windows for rooms in your home that open to secluded side and back yards, not public spaces.  Window Treatments can add some privacy to bay or bow windows that face the street, but the purpose of bay and bow windows is to create a light, open area.  Window treatments should accent the lines of bay and bow windows.  We recommend roman roll-up window treatments because they provide some light control without distracting from the inherent elegance of the window, and they can be rolled up completely for full views.  Our infographic describes other types of windows if you need replacement windows for a room that opens to the street. Internal blinds from Sunrise Windows offer additional privacy and light control.  These can be incorporated into the two side windows of a bay window, or for other ct awning windows or double hung windows.

Style

Both bay and bow windows complement homes of any style, but traditionally, the curved shape of bow windows is more Victorian.  The angular flat lines of bay windows have a more modern connotation.

Uses

bow windows ctSunroom Windows: Bay and bow windows are common types of Sunroom Windows, but they can achieve the same effect as sunroom windows in any room.  Replacing existing windows with bay or bow windows can create a sunny nook anywhere in your home.  Bay windows are more common for window seats because they project outwards at a steeper angle, which creates more depth.  A wide bow window can create a room within a room that really has the feel of a sunroom. (Image via www.bhg.com)

bay and bow windows ct

Kitchen Countertops: Bay windows can add additional counter space in kitchens.  They usually project outwards behind a sink.  People often associate bay and bow windows with large luxury kitchens, but both, particularly bay windows, are extremely practical options for small kitchens because in addition to providing additional counter space, they make the space seem more open. (image via www.followpics.net)

Reading Nooks: Bay and bow windows can create a reading nook or window seat in the master bedroom.  In downstairs living rooms they are often referred to as the 'poor man's sunroom.'  This is not to say that they are cheap, though. 

ct bay window dining

Dining Areas: Bay and bow windows are common features of dining areas in kitchens.  A wide bow window can surround a large dining table.  A bay window can provide seating on one side of a table, with chairs on the other side. (image via www.houzz.com)

Cost

The difference in cost between bay and bow windows is not significant, but both cost about 2.5 times more than a flat window of the same size.  The materials and installation will determine the total price.  Vinyl bay and bow windows are the least expensive, while wood and fiberglass cost more.  We recommend either vinyl or fiberglass for ct bay windows and bow windows.  In terms of installation, bow windows are a bit more expensive.  Contractors in CT will install either a small hip roof or a soffit tie-in to ensure a proper seal.  The initial cost may seem high, but bay and bow windows will increase the value of a home, and certainly cost less than a sunroom addition! For the best value, we recommend sunrise windows.  Please refer to our guide for additional information on how to increase the value of your home with new windows: